Child Education

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Child Education

Postby Daryl » Sun Mar 16, 2008 8:43 pm

Is anyone aware of any sources of information about Educating Children what to do if they get lost in a rural area?

I can find lots of stuff about:

  • What to do if you get lost in a shopping centre.
  • What to do as a Parent if your child goes missing.
  • Not to go with strangers etc (Stranger Danger).

but I am finding it difficult to find anything on education a child about what to do if you get lost in a rural area;

  • Try to retrace your steps
  • Stay in one place
  • Stay near a track or path
  • Make a noise (call for help, blow a whistle etc)
Daryl Toogood
President
Berkshire Search & Rescue Dogs

"I can explain it in Dog, but you only listen in Human."
-- Gaspode the wonder dog
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Re: Child Education

Postby Deborah » Sun Mar 16, 2008 9:20 pm

Hi and yes Norfolk can help. This year we are working with Children's Services and Norfolk Constabulary to launch a service for 9 - 14 year olds on what to do if they get lost. We plan to distribute 72,000 lealfelts and 250 teacher packs through the schools and attend major events in Norfolk to hand out information at the gates and on stands. We are at the stage of re writing the leaflet as we have just finished consulting with over 100 chidren from the age group and are due to go to the printers next month. We will back up the written material with more on our web site. We are currently visiting guides, brownies, cub groups and will use those once the launch has started to again inform young chidren. The leaflet is based on a Dorset leaflet and I must say a huge thanks to them for the art work and concept. We have changed theirs because of the feedback we got from our "critical friends". If you would like the final version we are happy to share and will gladly send master copies of the documents and project plans etc. If you would like drafts now then please ring me as there is so much I may have to put on a cd for you. It was mentioned at the last LSdog meeting and we said then very happy to share. Deborah
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Re: Child Education

Postby Daryl » Sun Mar 16, 2008 9:46 pm

Fantastic!

Message sent to you!!!
Daryl Toogood
President
Berkshire Search & Rescue Dogs

"I can explain it in Dog, but you only listen in Human."
-- Gaspode the wonder dog
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Re: Child Education

Postby Mojo » Mon Mar 31, 2008 7:51 pm

Yup, we teach Hug-A-Tree and another one with a yellow ribbon and they tie it as high as they can on a tree and then follow the principle of the Hug-A-Tree - maybe American but it works well [smile] .

The age range we teach is 4 - 12 with the Hug-A-Tree Programme and then the older one's we try and do small Navigational Workshops.

Another idea we tapped into was the Borough Council's 'Lost & Found' Scheme. When you are invited to Open Days or Public Events, offer them a 'Lost & Found' Scheme, they love it [biggrin] . Basically, in a nut shell, each child is registered as they walk in by the Parents/Guardians/etc, you'll need the child's FULL name, age and description of clothing and then the PARENTS/etc mobile number - Make sure it's a mobile number they have on them [wink]

The child has a simple wrist band on with a Unique Reference Number to that event - if they are lost they return to you and you check the band for the URN and phone the parent.

Easy as pie - donations flood in [biggrin]

Mojo
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Re: Child Education

Postby Daryl » Tue Apr 01, 2008 7:41 am

Hug-A-Tree
[huh]
Daryl Toogood
President
Berkshire Search & Rescue Dogs

"I can explain it in Dog, but you only listen in Human."
-- Gaspode the wonder dog
Daryl
 
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Location: Berkshire

Re: Child Education

Postby Mojo » Tue Apr 01, 2008 10:38 am

[wacko] Is it one of those days???

Hug A Tree Info:

http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/ccaps/hug_e.htm

http://www.gpsar.org/hugatree.html

Ifno taken from http://www.gpsar.org/hugatree.html - please keep in mind this is American adn needs adjusting, i'll dig our stuff out and forward it [sleep]

“Hug-A-Tree and Survive”

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The HUG-A-TREE and SURVIVE Program was started in San Diego, California after a search for a nine-year old boy who died in the local mountains. A group of those searchers put together an assembly program for children on how not to get lost, how to stay comfortable if they do get lost, and how to be spotted and found. We hope your children never need this knowledge, but if you discuss this handout and the assembly with your children, it may help them to remember one or more facts that will make the search short and successful.

1. Hug a Tree once you know you are lost.

One of the greatest fears anyone can have is of being alone. Hugging a tree or other stationary object and even talking to it calms the child down, and prevents panic. By staying in one place, the child if found by searchers far more quickly, and can’t be injured in a fall or other accident.


2. Always carry a trash bag and whistle on a picnic, hike, or camping trip.

By making a hole in the side of the bag for the face (always teach the child to make this hole as without it, there is a danger of suffocation), and putting it over the head so the face is showing out of the bag, it will keep the child warm and dry which will help prevent hypothermia. The whistle can be heard further away than the child's voice, and takes less energy to use.

3. My parents won’t be angry at me.

Time and again, children have avoided searchers because they were ashamed of getting lost, and afraid of punishment. Anyone can get lost, adult or child. If they know a happy reunion, filled with love is waiting, they will be less frightened, less prone to panic, and work hard to be found by hugging a tree as they have learned.

4. Make Yourself Big.

From helicopters, people are hard to see when they are standing up, when they are in a group of trees, or wearing dark and drab clothing. find your tree to hug near a small clearing if possible. Wear a red or orange jacket or vest when you go near the woods or desert. Lie down when the helicopter flies over. If it is cold and you are rested, make crosses or “SOS” using broken shrubbery, rocks or by dragging your foot in the dirt.


5. There are no animals out there that can hurt you in this country.

If you hear a noise at night, yell at it. If it is an animal it will run away to protect itself. If it is a searcher, you will be found. Fears of the dark and of “lions and tigers and bears” are a big factor in panicking children into running. They need strong reassurance to stay put and be safe.

6. You have hundreds of friends looking for you.

We have had children in the local area of a search tell us, “My parents would never spend the money to search for me with all these people.” Search personnel are mainly volunteers who work with other professionals and charge nothing and do it because they care. Many children who are lost don’t realize that if they sit down and stay put, one of the many searchers will find them. Some are afraid of strangers and may not respond to yells and, have actually hidden from searchers they knew were looking for them.

7. Footprinting your child is a five minute exercise that cuts down the time of a search by several hours.

Have the child walk across a piece of aluminum foil on a soft surface, such as carpeting or a folded towel. Mark the foil with the child’s name. With this print, trackers can separate your child’s track from the hundreds of others in the area, and quickly determine the direction of travel.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Additional information that might be helpful:

1. Try to keep them from getting lost in the first place, which is probably impossible.
Children are easily distracted off the trail, so teach them to stay on the trail. Never let your child walk trails alone. Pick out a high landmark such as a prominent hill, or note the direction of the sun; this prevents disorientation.

2. Admit to yourself when you become lost.
It can and does happen to anyone, yet is a source of shame when it happens. When you become lost, admit it, accept it, and take actions to be comfortable and in the area when the searchers arrive. Use your head since it is your best survival tool; you can’t lose it.

3. Call the police or sheriff quickly, if your child is lost.
Ask them for a search and rescue team. The search area expand so quickly due to the victim’s possible movements that rapid response is critically important. A call to the police or sheriff which is cancelled gives the searchers practice and helps keep them alert. Remember too, that the searchers do not mind turning back if the child is found prior to their arrival. A slow response is dangerous, especially if bad weather wipes out the track, and exposure to the elements is a consideration.

4. Be available for interviewing.
Clues which lead to finding the child in good shape usually come from family and friends who remain on the scene and talk openly and accurately with the search leader or his representative. Any personal information will be kept confidential.


This Program is Dedicated To The Memory of Jimmy Beveridge
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Re: Child Education

Postby Mojo » Tue Apr 01, 2008 10:45 am

http://www.nasar.org/nasar/hug_a_tree_program.php

The above is a better one.

http://www.nasar.org/nasar/downloads/HAT_handout_fs.pdf IF this is no good, look into the yellow ribbon instead [biggrin]
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Re: Child Education

Postby Mojo » Tue Apr 01, 2008 10:48 am

And this is just for you

http://www.nasar.org/nasar/downloads/HA ... Book_s.pdf

I think you have touched a nerve here - not like me to be overly out-spoken [ninja]

Sorry I'll shut up now x
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Re: Child Education

Postby Mojo » Tue Apr 01, 2008 11:08 am

PROMISE I'll shut up after this.....

We did a presentation/talk with a group of Scouts about 3 weeks ago. They are on the upper age limit of the Hug-A-Tree (HAT), so we went through a brief history f the team, equipment, and search techniques. At the end of the sessiob we allowed 30mins for a search scenario - you need to bear in mind this was Easter time and we set this scenario.....


Cheshire Lowland Search & Rescue Team
Registered Charity Number: 110 5454


Exercise ‘Egg-static’
There has been a phone call to Cheshire Police at 4pm today after a group of 5 friends didn’t return home after school. Parents are extremely worried and it’s now dark with still no sign of the group.

The school was informed earlier and teachers were asked to search playgrounds and playing fields, which they have completed but still they remain missing.

Cheshire Police have asked if you could help them search around the immediate area for any of the group of friends and also for any clue’s you may find along the way.

Their names are:
- James Smart
- Lucy Smart
- Bob Button
- Holly Button
- Samantha White.

Remember a clue is - “ANYTHING & EVERYTHING”.


Guidance Notes for Training Staff

The immediate area will be split into two sections/areas prior to the start and Chocolate Eggs with multi-coloured foils on will be placed within the areas for the ‘Searchers’ to locate.

The ‘5 missing friends’ are actually Easter Eggs
- 2 x Smarties Eggs
- 2 x Chocolate Buttons Eggs
- 1 x White Milky way Chocolate Egg
(This is reflected within the name of the missing friend, i.e. Lucy Smart – Smarties).

The ‘Searchers’ will be split into two groups and assigned a search area. The ‘Searchers’ will be supported by a member of Cheshire Lowland Search & Rescue Team along with any other adult who would like to assist/join in.

Our aim is to provide a ‘hands on’ experience of how a ‘live’ Search Team would search when called upon. We aim for the ‘Searchers’ to learn through fun, to work as a team and to improve inter-team communications within a safe working environment.

We hope this handout is of some assistance and please don’t hesitate to contact me with any further enquiries or if I can be of further assistance.

Thank you once again.

Jo
Chair
Cheshire Lowland Search & Rescue Team

http://www.cheshire-sarteam.org

.... If it's of any use to anyone, please use it!!!!

If only all teams could have a cenytral pooling system, we'd all be better off - financially and mentally [wink]

Give it a whirl, you can always get Cream Egg's 12 mths of the year now! The outlay wasn't that much, we had more fun than the Scouts that night. Just check prior that they have no diabetic's/anyone on low sugar diets/etc, if so supplement the eggs with something else.

Hope this is all f some use and sort of on topic (?)

Mojo x
Last edited by Mojo on Wed Apr 02, 2008 11:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Child Education

Postby Mojo » Tue Apr 01, 2008 11:14 am

This was the session layout.....


Cheshire Lowland Search & Rescue Team
Registered Charity Number: 110 5454

http://www.cheshire-sarteam.org

Introductions
Joanne Mc – Chair
Ray M – Communications & Equipment Officer
Dave Mc – Medical Team Lead
Joanne P - Dog Team Rep (plus Paddy!)

What Do You Think We Search For?
(Allow individuals to put suggestions forward)

In Cheshire we mainly get called to look for ‘Vulnerable’ people.

Vulnerable people can be anyone who may not be able to look after themselves if they are lost or injured, such as Children, Elderly People, Disabled People or people who haven’t been well and simply walked away and found that they are lost.

Explain about different weather conditions and how they affect priorities (if time permits)

How Do You Think We Search?
(Allow individuals to put suggestions forward)

In the Search & Rescue world, we use a technique called a “Searcher Cube”. You imagine your in a box and you need to look forwards, backwards, up, down, left and right.

Demonstrate

What else can we use?
(Allow individuals to put suggestions forward)

List may include Helicopters, Dogs, Divers, etc

We also use our senses – now we can’t taste someone missing but we can look, listen, smell and sometimes if we come across a large patch of dense woodland, we can feel.

We Use Lots Of Equipment Whilst Searching
Split into two groups

GROUP ONE
Basket Stretcher and Casualty Bag

Has anyone ever been in a stretcher?
What was it like?
Does anyone want to have a go? Explain what we use it for

GROUP TWO
Personal Floatation Devices
Throw Lines

Allow individuals to wear a PFD and have a go throwing a throw line – if room dictates.

Explain what we use it for


SWAP GROUPS


Search Exercise
Individuals to stay within the same groups and to be given the briefing as laid out on separate sheet.

Health & Safety must be paramount and therefore close supervision is required at all times by a member of Cheshire Lowland Search & Rescue Team and a responsible adult if necessary.

Debriefing
Thank everyone for taking part and a quick analysis of how the Search Exercise was carried out.

Presentation Prepared By: Jo
Contact Email: chair@cheshire-sarteam.org


....Once again, if it's of any use - USE IT!

Mojo x
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